Lack of polling places and long lines punctuate reports of voter suppression in Arizona

March 26, 2016
AJ Vicens for Mother Jones
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Faith Decker, a 19-year-old sophomore at Arizona State University, got off work a little early Tuesday night so she could vote in her first-ever primary. She arrived at a church in southeast Phoenix just before 7 p.m. to find "the line wrapped completely around the corner, 300 to 400 people." After waiting in that line for more than three hours, she finally reached the check-in desk. She was told that she couldn't vote—not because the polls had closed three hours before, but because she was registered in a different county.

Voter suppression not confined to Arizona - activists in Idaho, Utah and American Samoa working to increase voter participation

March 26, 2016
Alice Ollstein for Think Progress
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Last night’s primary in Arizona delivered big wins and sizable delegate hauls to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. While Bernie Sanders dominated the Democratic caucuses in Idaho and Utah, and Utah Republicans handed a win to Ted Cruz.
Republicans in the U.S. territory of American Samoa gave one delegate each to Ted Cruz and Donald Trump.
But with reports of three hour wait times, online glitches, and legal restrictions, the contests also highlighted serious voting rights problems in those states.

Flint crisis shines light on Navajo water contamination and encourages movement against environmental racism in U.S.

February 8, 2016
Courtney Parker
news photo - Figure from EPA Pacific Southwest Region 9 Addressing Uranium Conta

Recent media coverage and spiraling public outrage over the water crisis in Flint, Michigan has completely eclipsed the ongoing environmental justice struggles of the Navajo. Even worse, the media continues to frame the situation in Flint as some sort of isolated incident. It is not. Rather, it is symptomatic of a much wider and deeper problem of environmental racism in the United States.

Tribal activists plan community owned solar power plant

October 17, 2014
Mary Hansen - Yes! Magazine
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A proposed community-owned solar project on an abandoned coal mine in Arizona illustrates how cooperative economics make it possible to stop extracting fossil fuels—without leaving workers behind.

Arizona’s recent primary election was a disaster, especially in ‪Maricopa County‬. TAKE ACTION - help restore democracy in Arizona!

Maricopa County Recorder Helen Purcell has done it again.
As the top official in charge of making sure every eligible person can vote and that every vote is counted in Arizona’s most populous county, Helen Purcell created and presided over another disaster of an election. For the good of the country, and to ensure the integrity of upcoming elections, it’s time for her to resign. #AdiosHelen
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