A Democracy Movement for the U.S.A.


Liberty Tree is uniquely committed to building a democracy movement for the U.S.A.. We provide vital support to grassroots campaigns for democratic reform in many areas of American life, and bring those campaigns together to form a united movement for democracy. 
 
To get involved please explore our work, subscribe to our news list and make a contribution today!

Our current priority projects:

Democracy ConventionLiberty Tree would like to thank the many people who made the 2nd Democracy Convention such a huge success!  To access audio, text, and video from 2013 Convention click here and for archives of the 2011 Democracy Convention click here.  To recieve updates about the next Democracy Convention be sure to join our email list!

Liberty Tree has launched a ground breaking new project called the Global Climate Convergence for People, Planet and Peace over Profit.  The GCC is a multi-year education and direct action campaign that kicked off this spring with a global “10 Days to Change Course” week of action from Earth Day to May Day 2014.  To get involved click here!

Wisconsin WaveThe Wisconsin Wave is dedicated to uniting Wisconsinites against corporatization and austerity and for democracy and shared prosperity.  After playing an important role during the first three years of the Wisconsin Uprising the Wave is continuing to organize a long-term movement for democracy. 

Move to AmendThe national Move to Amend coalition, of which Liberty Tree is a co-founding organization, is the nation's largest, most diverse, and most deeply rooted campaign working to amend the U.S. Constitution to protect our democratic rights by overturning the 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court ruling.


Latest Democracy Movement News:

Gar Alperovitz on the cooperative economy's enormous potential

May 22, 2014
Orion Magazine

IN THE MID-1960s, when author, historian, and political economist Gar Alperovitz was working as legislative director for Senator Gaylord Nelson, change was in the air. Ink had dried on an early version of the Clean Air Act, the civil rights movement had won major victories, and the first Earth Day was in the works. The U.S. still faced plenty of serious challenges, but many Americans felt their country was capable of dealing with them successfully.

Public Banking & Economic Democracy

May 21, 2014
Gwendolyn Hallsmith
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Private banks have not always been accepted institutions, fixtures of commerce, and purveyors of most of our economic transactions. Throughout US history, there have been robust public conversations about banks, largely due to their propensity to derail the economy when their business models fail. One example of this was in rural Vermont in 1806, when the state established their first public bank. Testimony on that bill, from Governor Tichenor lays out the problem:

Participatory Budgeting in NYC: Governing at the Grassroots

May 21, 2014
Mike Menser and Ron Hayduk
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Like much of the rest of the globe, New York City is beset by two crises: economic instability and the changing climate. Any hope of making our intensely unequal and unsustainable city more equitable and resilient requires fundamental changes in the relationship between the government and its people, and between the economy and its infrastructure. This requires more than a change of administrations; it requires a reconstruction of the governance process itself.

Jackson, Miss. using worker-owned cooperatives to advance economic democracy

May 17, 2014
Gracie Davie
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When Iya’Falola Omobola first crossed the Mississippi state border 10 years ago, she felt uneasy. A friend told her that she was “feeling the energy from all those bodies hanging in the trees.” Yet, Omobola’s feeling soon changed. Born into a family of civil rights and labor organizers in Cleveland, Ohio, Omobola came to see Jackson as the Phoenix that rises from the ashes.

Participatory Budgeting continues to grow in NYC

April 4, 2014
Jay Cassano
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It would be tough to find something people like to complain about more than politicians. Now, thanks to New York City's Participatory Budgeting project, we get to do part of their job for them.

With the fast flow of information these days, the average citizen can easily be just as informed as any local politician or policy wonk. So why do we need politicians to spend our tax dollars for us? Especially when it comes local communities, people have a visceral and intuitive understanding of the changes they want to see.

NYT: Cooperative businesses benefit both worker-owners and their communities

March 25, 2014
Shaila Dewan
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If you happen to be looking for your morning coffee near Golden Gate Park and the bright red storefront of the Arizmendi Bakery attracts your attention, congratulations. You have found what the readers of The San Francisco Bay Guardian, a local alt-weekly, deem the city’s best bakery. But it has another, less obvious, distinction.